Pasar Badung and Kumbasari Market is a center of town’s economics which is located in Gajah Mada Street, that is main road and become a shopping centre of Bali. This traditional market is apposite to the village temple that is one of three biggest temples in Denpasar. Badung Market is the largest market in Bali and acts as a sort of clearing house for many island goods. Sarong vendors in Padangbai may buy their wares at Badung Market. Fruit and vegetable producers from around Bali may bring their goods to market at Badung Market, so the market is humming with activity 24/7.

Inside Badung Market

Badung Market does not as big as like now because have changed experiences and modification which is adapting to the requirement and town growth. Badung Market cannot be discharged from the existence of an existing market in the cross Badung’s river that is called Kumbasari Market because the local society will feel incompletely go for shopping if they are not come to Kumbasari Market, especially for the Balinese who want to buy the ceremony items.


Around the ground floor areas of Badung Market, especially outside the stairwells, one can observe older Balinese ladies preparing and selling traditional Balinese snack foods, complete with ground chili’s, vegetables and and array of other items. You may not know exactly what you’re eating but it could be a wonderful experience and one that will not break the bank.
Inside the first floor is reserved for meat, fish, fruit and veg. The upper floors for spices and traditional Balinese and Muslim attire, Denpasar has a decent sized Muslim population, and they sell in the market too, along with Chinese traders. Also sold are Balinese ceremonial equipment such as sarongs, umbrellas and baskets. You might see the odd westerner here, but by no means is this a tourist destination.
Badung Market has plenty of parking area, however the entrance at Jl. Sulawesi may seem a little hectic. Parking is also found along the streets leading away from the market. Some people have reported that local women offer their services as ‘guides’ but this does not seem to be the rule. You do not need a guide to explore Badung market and wandering around by yourself is truly an education in Balinese culture and commerce.

Badung Market History :

Badung Market is opened on 24 April 1984 by Bali ‘s Governor, Prof. Dr. Ida Bagus Mantra. Then after experiencing of the fire accident, it has been repaired in year 2000 at that moment Bali ‘s Governor is Mr. Dewa Made Berata. This market owns the broadness about 14.544 M² and broadly park 9064 M² which is built in four floors. The local people who go for shopping at this market are not only from environment of Denpasar community but also come from outside of town. The moment before the big holiday like Galungan, Kuningan, Nyepi and others, this market is always crowded by the buyer which are most of them the local society.

Badung Market Opening Time :

Badung Market is opened at 5 o’clock in the morning and close at 5 o’clock in the evening. Then, it is changed by the evening market opened from 05:00 pm until at 05:00 am the day after. Meanwhile at Senggol Market in Kumbasari is opened at 02:00 pm and closed at 11:30 pm. The unique of Senggol Market’s name is possibility taken away from the situation and condition of people movement on shopping where they each others jog because of visitor denseness. This Senggol Market is selling the variety of food, from the cheap Balinese, Javanese and Chinese cookery. It is also sell the various types of clothes from adult until children one.

Badung Market & Kumbasari Art Market Location :

Badung Market is encircled by shop along the street of Gajah Mada, in the right side there is Sulawesi Street which is famous of cloth items. Denpasar Traditional Market is progressively strengthening the identity of a center of Denpasar’s economics which is opened within 24 hours and never silent by visitor. It is located in a massive four storey building on the banks of the Badung river in the center of downtown, close to Jl. Gajah Mada. Organized chaos reigns outside, with cars and motorbikes trying to find a place to park, people carrying bushels of produce of every kind imaginable. Come in the morning and check out the food vendors.

 

KUMBASARI ART MARKET

The Kumbasari Art Market is one of Denpasar’s main icons, located right across the Badung River, opposite the Badung Market. The market is a primary source of arts and handicrafts, products chiefly coming from the island’s various art producing communities, the likes of Ubud and the central Bali highlands, while also featuring galleries of onsite painters and craftsmen.

Locally referred to as ‘Pasar Kumbasari’, the Kumbasari Art Market in central Denpasar is easy to reach, within only a half hour’s transfer, from the main resort areas on Bali’s south such as Kuta and Sanur. The market’s setting might seem downtrodden, much of what you would find at any traditional market in Bali, however the diverse selection of items available will easily appeal to avid shoppers, especially with its bargain and wholesale prices.

Like the Badung Market, Kumbasari is one of the island’s oldest, open since the late 70s. Its four levels are home to over 200 kiosks and well over a thousand stalls. Haggling is accepted throughout, even though most vendors have commonly labelled their items with fixed price tags over the years. Larger shop owners can speak English, and can arrange deals for shipment and packaging.

Although open around the clock, the opening times of the many different stalls within Kumbasari Art Market vary. Mostly in the mornings however, Kumbasari takes on a traditional morning market scene, somewhat chaotic much like the Badung market, catering to daily necessities of locals with fresh produce and groceries. By noon as the morning frenzy subsides, most of the art stalls will have already opened, taking over the scene. From kitsch barong keychains under a dollar, to towering and shiny silver sculptures over USD 400 (IDR 5 million), choices are virtually endless. By night, some parts of the market open up with food stalls.

The second level features a large hall where you can find a huge variety of souvenirs and art items, from silverware and mini sculptures, ornamental cloths, Balinese batiks and weavings in their raw form or as ready-to-wear shirts, various classical and contemporary style paintings, and many other knick-knacks. The locals also source their daily household necessities and religious items from several shops here, from silk parasols, temple attire, to incense, flower offerings and silver holy water vessels, some of which also make exotic décor items to spruce up your living room back home.